Numbers in Sinhala – Part 2: Giving Your Phone Number

 

A reasonable question you should be asking right now:

Why has Dilshan wasted his time (and more importantly, mine) by doing an entire post on giving out your phone number in Sinhala? We already covered numbers 0-9 in Part 1, didn’t we?

Allow me to explain… And also, don’t miss the fun assignment I’ve given you at the end. >>>

 

The reasons why I did this “phone” post (even if giving out your number is not an everyday occurrence):

  1. Unlike in English, in Sinhala you need to tweak the format of the digits you saw in Part 1 when giving out your number
  2. This same format is used for something more important (which I’ve mentioned below)

So, in the words of sneaky Kaa:

Let’s begin…

 

All You Need To Remember From Part 1

zero – 0bin∙dhu∙wȧ      
one – 1é∙kȧ      
two – 2dhé∙kȧ      
three – 3thu∙nȧ      
four – 4ha∙thȧ∙rȧ      
five – 5pa∙ha      
six – 6ha∙yȧ      
seven – 7ha∙thȧ      
eight – 8a∙tȧ      
nine – 9na∙mȧ∙yȧ      

 


How To Convert To “Phone” Digits

Don’t get bogged down by this “mathematical” looking table. You’ll understand how to convert it naturally when you look at pronunciation tables right after.

 

Let’s see this in action below:


 

“Phone” Zero in Sinhala

A “Friendly”

 

0bin∙dhu∙wayi      

 

Lazy But Smart Infographic:  “Phone” Zero in Sinhala

 


 

“Phone” 1-9 in Sinhala

(The “Repeaters”)

 

1é∙kayi      
2dhé∙kayi      
3thu∙nayi      
4ha∙thȧ∙rayi      
5pa∙hayi      
6ha∙yayi      
7ha∙thayi      
8a∙tayi      
9na∙mȧ∙yayi      

 

 

Lazy But Smart Infographic:  “Phone” 0-9 in Sinhala

 

 


 

Flashcard Test

My advice: Keep going back and forth until you get all of them correct in one go. You’ll need it for the next post.

 

 

 

three – 3

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

thu∙nayi

      

 

 

 

one – 1

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

é∙kayi

      

 

 

 

four – 4

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

ha∙thȧ∙rayi

      

 

 

 

five – 5

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

pa∙hayi

      

 

 

 

nine – 9

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

na∙mȧ∙yayi

      

 

 

 

two – 2

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

dhé∙kayi

      

 

 

 

seven – 7

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

ha∙thayi

      

 

 

 

eight – 8

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

a∙tayi

      

 

 

 

six – 6

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

ha∙yayi

      

 

 

 

zero – 0

>> Click to view the Sinhala translation <<
>> Click to go back to the English translation <<

 

bin∙dhu∙wayi

      

 

 


 

What You’ll See In The Next Post:

  • How these “phone” numbers can be used to specify quantities.
  • We’ll also start inserting what you know into basic sentences.

 

Fun Assignment:  Call a friend and give them your number

  • Call up that Sri Lankan person who’s the most impressed that you’re learning Sinhala.
  • Tell them you want to practice your numbers in under a minute.
  • Give your phone number in Sinhala using the infographics above (extra points for doing it without peeking)
  • Ask them to repeat it in English to know if you got it right
  • Comment below and tell me how it went.

(I got my wife to do this and the results were hilarious)

 

Leave all your comments below and do check out my latest premium product if you haven’t already:

http://www.lazybutsmartsinhala.com/10-most-popular-sinhala-posts/

Ciao!

4 Responses to Numbers in Sinhala – Part 2: Giving Your Phone Number

  1. mala May 17, 2017 at 18:23 #

    Hoi

    I want tolk very fast? what van i do?

  2. Anthony Perry May 21, 2017 at 22:22 #

    In the German language they also change a number when giving telephone numbers Tzwo instead of Zwei and that’s it whereas Sinhala is more logical.

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