Sinhala Words For Days, Weeks, Months, & Years… (But Didn’t We Already Do This?)

Sinhala Words For Days Weeks Months Years

 

No, we didn’t.

We didn’t cover these essential basic Sinhala words on the blog already.

(I know, how embarrassing for Mr. “I think I am the most meticulous and clever Sinhala blogger in the stratosphere”)

You’ll remember that we covered days of the week in Sinhala, we learned the months, but we didn’t learn general words like “days”, “weeks”, “months”, & “years” in Sinhala.

(So very embarrassing… My ego and I are sharing a chunky serving of humble pie as we speak)… > > >

 

Now, on any other respectable Sinhala learning website, this could be covered in a simply 2 x 4 table and done with. Everybody goes home in time for dinner and may even find time to watch some late night talk show while they drift off to sleep thinking about their meeting with their shitty boss the next morning.

But no…

Your favorite “Dilshonian” (and actual nickname I’ve got from a buddy of mine in Monaco) and Dilshonian’s big fat chatty mouth always likes to make an entire “event” out of a simple post. So I’ve thrown in the vocabulary, sample phrases, random quotes, a quiz (you guys seem to be loving it in past posts), and of course my nonsensical ramblings (which, erm, some of you guys have been hating in past posts).

 

Creativity is the ability to play – (and) to be able to turn that facility on and off when necessary.

– Ricky Gervais

 

I don’t know if I’d qualify for being called “creative” (yes folks, that’s a rare moment of genuine modesty that you just witnessed) but I swear by Zeus, I LOVE being playful here. It’s my own private little playground in which I’m lucky to get to be myself and play with you on a daily basis.

Let’s go play.

 

 

How We’re Going To Play Today:

 

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Shall we get on with it, then?

And Dilshan said “Let there be Sinhala lessons” and there were Sinhala lessons…

– (and you thought I was joking about my ego)

 

The Learning Part

1. “Day”

 

Vocabulary:

Daydha∙vȧ∙sȧ      

Sample Phrases Using “Day”

Which day is it today?a∙dhȧ   dha∙vȧ∙sȧ   mo∙kak∙dhȧ?1      

Notes:

1 Remember that in a previous post we learned that ‘a∙dhȧ’ = “today”. Also remember that in Video Tutorial 2 we learned that ‘mo∙kak∙dhȧ’ = “what?”

 

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2. “Days”

Vocabulary:

Daysdha∙vas      

Sample Phrases Using “Days”

How many days?dha∙vas   kee∙yak∙dhȧ?2      
For how many days?dha∙vas   kee∙yȧ∙kȧ∙tȧ∙dhȧ?3      
For how many days will you be coming?o∙yaa   en∙né   dha∙vas   kee∙yȧ∙kȧ∙tȧ∙dhȧ?4      
For how many days will you be going?o∙yaa   yan∙né   dha∙vas   kee∙yȧ∙kȧ∙tȧ∙dhȧ?5      
On which days?koyi   dha∙vas   vȧ∙lȧ∙dhȧ?6      
On which days will you be here?o∙yaa   mé∙hé   in∙né   koyi   dha∙vas vȧ∙lȧ∙dhȧ?7      

Notes:

2 ‘kee∙yak∙dhȧ?’ = “how many?”

3 ‘kee∙yȧ∙kȧ∙tȧ∙dhȧ?’ = “for how many?”

4 ‘én∙né’ is derived from the word ‘é∙nȧ∙va’ (“coming”)

5 ‘yan∙né’ is derived from the word ‘ya∙nȧ∙va’ (“going”)

6 ‘koyi’ = “which”. Another word for “which” is ‘mo∙nȧ’

7 ‘in∙né’ is derived from the word ‘in∙nȧ∙va’ (“staying/waiting/being”)

 

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3. “Week”, “Month”, & “Year”

Vocabulary:

Weeksa∙thi∙yȧ8      
Monthmaa∙sȧ∙yȧ      
Yearauw∙rudh∙dhȧ9      

Notes:

8 Another word for “week” that is often used in Sinhala is ‘su∙maa∙nȧ∙yȧ’

9 You’ll remember that we already saw this word in my lazy but smart guide to the Sinhalese & Tamil New Year

 

*BONUS WORD*:

Weekendsa∙thi   an∙thȧ∙yȧ10      

Notes:

10 This term is not that often used when speaking. Instead I’ve heard people referring to the weekend as ‘sé∙nȧ∙su∙raa∙dhȧ i∙ri∙dha’ (“Saturday Sunday”) instead. Click here for the post I did on days of the week in Sinhala

 

Sample Phrases Using “Week”

(Replace ‘sa∙thi∙yȧ’ with any of the other words in the table above)

This weekmḗ   sa∙thi∙yȧ11      
Last weekgi∙yȧ   sa∙thi∙yȧ12      
Next weeké∙nȧ   sa∙thi∙yȧ13      

Notes:

11 ‘mḗ’ = “this”…. (obviously)

12 ‘gi∙yȧ’ = “(the one) gone by”; as in, “the week gone by”

13 ‘é∙nȧ’ = “(the one) coming”; as in, “the week coming”. Also, another common way of saying it is ‘la∙bȧ∙nȧ sa∙thi∙yȧ’ = “the week we will receive”. Feel free to use either. They’re both correct.

 

 

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4. “Weeks”, “Months”, & “Years”

Vocabulary:

Weekssa∙thi14      
Monthsmaa∙sȧ      
Yearsauw∙ru∙dhu      

Notes:

14 Another word for “weeks” is is ‘su∙maa∙nȧ’ (which is the plural of ‘su∙maa∙nȧ∙yȧ’)

 

Sample Phrases Using “Weeks”

(Replace ‘sa∙thi’ with any of the other words in the table above)

How many weeks?sa∙thi   kee∙yak∙dhȧ?2      
For how many weeks?sa∙thi   kee∙yȧ∙kȧ∙tȧ∙dhȧ?3      
For how many weeks will you be coming?o∙yaa   en∙né   sa∙thi   kee∙yȧ∙kȧ∙tȧ∙dhȧ?4      
For how many weeks will you be going?o∙yaa   yan∙né   sa∙thi   kee∙yȧ∙kȧ∙tȧ∙dhȧ?5      

Notes (These are a repeat of what I said earlier in the post, but saying it again so that you don’t have to scroll up):

2 ‘kee∙yak∙dhȧ?’ = “how many?”

3 ‘kee∙yȧ∙kȧ∙tȧ∙dhȧ?’ = “for how many?”

4 ‘én∙né’ is derived from the word ‘é∙nȧ∙va’ (“coming”)

5 ‘yan∙né’ is derived from the word ‘ya∙nȧ∙va’ (“going”)

 

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The Quiz Part

 

1

 

1. How would you say the following in Sinhala?:

a. “This month

b. “Last year”

c. “Next weekend”

 

2. Translate the following into Sinhala:

a. “Which day is it tomorrow?” (hint: “tomorrow” = ‘hé∙tȧ’)

b. “On which days are you coming here?”

 

3. How would you say the following in Sinhala?:

a. “How many months?”

b. “For how many years will you be staying here?”

 

Leave your answers and all other comments in the section below. I think 2b is the trickiest. So pay extra attention to that one.

Speak soon!

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23 Responses to Sinhala Words For Days, Weeks, Months, & Years… (But Didn’t We Already Do This?)

  1. Tracey January 17, 2016 at 07:25 #

    fingers crossed i do better on this than the last quiz
    1
    a. “This month – me maasaya
    b. “Last year” – giya auwrudhdha
    c. “Next weekend” – ena sathi anthaya
    2
    a. “Which day is it tomorrow?” – koyi dhavasa heta
    b. “On which days are you coming here?” – oyaa mehe enne koyi dhavas valadha?
    3
    a. “How many months?” – maasa keeyakdha
    b. “For how many years will you be staying here?” – oyaa enne inne auwrudhu?

    • Suthan January 17, 2016 at 10:32 #

      Tracey & Clarissa, I think that 3b is Oyaa méné inné anuvrudhu keeyakatadha?

      • Dilshan Jayasinha January 18, 2016 at 07:51 #

        Thanks Suthan, you’re right (there’s a slight typo in your answer but I know you’ve understood it correctly. Well done)

    • Dilshan Jayasinha January 18, 2016 at 07:50 #

      Hi Tracey,

      Yes, it is better than the last quiz. 2 corrections though:

      2a. hé∙tȧ dha∙vȧ∙sȧ mo∙kak∙dhȧ? (or hé∙tȧ koyi dha∙vȧ∙sȧ∙dhȧ?)

      And 2b also needs to be corrected (see Suthan’s suggestion below – although there is small typo in that answer too).

      Give it one final shot?

      • Tracey January 18, 2016 at 12:20 #

        Hi Dilshan
        one of the problems i have with answering the questions is knowing in what order the words go in because i know its not like English where you construct the sentence in word order. Is there an easy way to help learn sentence structure or is there no set rule?

        • Dilshan Jayasinha January 24, 2016 at 20:41 #

          Good question. Unfortunately I don’t have a good answer yet. What I can tell you is that in spoken Sinhala there is a little more leeway to shift the words around and still make sense than when compared to English. (So that should be your first reason to feel relieved). For example “I’m coming tomorrow” can be said as “mama heta enava” or “heta mama eneva” or even (although it’s my least favorite), mama enava heta. They all can be said and no one will look at you in a strange way. On the other hand, you can’t say “I’m tomorrow coming” and expect the other person not to giggle….

          I’ll keep taking notes on this and once I have enough understanding shall do a post on it. Thanks for the suggestion.

  2. Jayamathan January 17, 2016 at 07:51 #

    Bohoma isthoothi

  3. Clarissa January 17, 2016 at 10:11 #

    1. How would you say the following in Sinhala?:
    a. “This month = me maasaya
    b. “Last year” = giya auwrudhdha
    c. “Next weekend” = ena sathi anthaya

    2. Translate the following into English:(did you mean Sinhala??? Cause English to… English well maybe I’m just tired it is 3am…)
    a. “Which day is it tomorrow?” (hint: “tomorrow” = ‘hé∙tȧ’) = heta dhavasa mokakadha?
    b. “On which days are you coming here?” = oyaa mehe enne koyi dhavasa valadha?

    3. How would you say the following in Sinhala?:
    a. “How many months?” maasa keeyakdha?
    b. “For how many years will you be staying here?” = oyaa enne auwrudhu keyakatadha?

    Thanks so much as always! And can’t wait to see what 2016 brings on your blog. I actually wrote a post on my blog about goals for 2016 and one of them is to learn Sinhala… enough to get by. So you wI’ll be a big part of me reaching that goal! And happy birthday to your father in law!

    • Dilshan Jayasinha January 18, 2016 at 07:54 #

      Thanks for the correction (it should be translate to Sinhala, I’ve just now fixed it)

      About your answers, wow, you’ve got just last one slightly wrong. Want to take a stab at correcting it? (hint: see Sathan’s suggestion to you under Tracey’s comment).

      • Dilshan Jayasinha January 18, 2016 at 07:56 #

        PS: Thanks for the birthday wishes to my father in law. Also, I’ll do my best to make one of your 2016 goals possible :)

  4. wesley January 17, 2016 at 16:51 #

    I’m in Sri Lanka now so I’ll be using some of these in practice tomorrow ;) Thanks for all you’re doing Dilshan, and looking forward to the next premium material!

    • Dilshan Jayasinha January 18, 2016 at 07:57 #

      Thanks Wesley. Next premium material should hopefully be out in 2 weeks. Haven’t done the audio recording yet for that. Will keep you posted.

  5. Elizabeth January 17, 2016 at 16:59 #

    Hello Dilshan

    Yes, I remember you did give a lesson to this effect. Very good for the beginners.

    You really are a good teacher sir.

    Keep up the good work.

    Talk to you later.

    Elizabeth T.

  6. wesley January 23, 2016 at 20:33 #

    i just got back from sri lanka everyone was very impressed with my knowledge of sinhala :-) I’m looking forward to the next premium materials u will be selling. When can we expect that? (Or a beta?)

    One suggestion; Consider implementing sound clips in the PDF file, so that we get the same functionality as here on the site where we can immediately listen to the phrase we want, instead of putting it in a separate MP3 file bundled with many other phrases.

    • wesley January 23, 2016 at 22:46 #

      oops sorry i noticed my previous post did went up had some problems when i was in sri lanka to reply as it gave me errors during the submission. So you can ignore my questions as you already answered them. Looking forward to the coming weeks!

      • Dilshan Jayasinha January 24, 2016 at 21:06 #

        No problem for the duplicate comment. As you may have seen in my email from today, the deadline I’ve set for the next premium product is 7th Feb.. 13 days more!

    • Dilshan Jayasinha January 24, 2016 at 21:04 #

      Believe me, I have tried including the audio in the PDF but the file becomes too chunky and unstable. But I’ll keep working on it; I refuse to think that there isn’t a solution for it in 2016.

  7. Jan January 24, 2016 at 11:40 #

    Dear Dilshan

    I am in Sri Lanka now and I am pleased that I can use quite a lot of Sinhala words and phrases.
    For me as a Dutchman its a nice surprise that also some Dutch words are used in the Sinhala Language.
    Thank you for all your lessons

    Jan

    • Dilshan Jayasinha January 24, 2016 at 23:17 #

      Thanks Jan, that’s interesting. Would you be able to give me a couple of examples of these words? I find this fascinating.

  8. Buddhika February 18, 2016 at 09:41 #

    Hi Dilshan, I have been following your blog for awhile and just caught up on your recent posts. Only last week I returned to Australia from a trip to SL to see my family there and your blog has really helped me to communicate with them. I just wanted to say thanks to you for helping me bridge the language gap. And a belated congratulations to you and Mrs Smart! May you have a happy and carefree life together.

    • Dilshan Jayasinha February 29, 2016 at 11:07 #

      Ah, you’re one of those “silent” followers… Glad you reached out Buddhika and thanks for the kind words and the wedding wishes. Happy that I was able to help. Take care and let’s try to be a little more vocal from now on, ok?

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